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Karnataka 2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 12 The Voter

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The Voter Questions and Answers, Notes, Summary

The Voter Comprehension I

The Voter Questions And Answers 2nd PUC KSEEB Solution Question 1.
The roof was a popular young man because of he-
a. had not abandoned his village.2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 12 The Voter
b. wanted to guide his people.
c. was forced to return to his village.
Answer:
(a) had not abandoned his village.

The Voter Summary 2nd Puc KSEEB Solution Question 2.
Why was Marcus considered rich and powerful?
Answer:
Marcus had two long cars and had just built himself the biggest house anyone had seen in these parts. He had entertained his people slaughtering five bulls and countless goats to feed the people. Though the village had no electricity, he had installed a private plant to supply electricity to his new home. Secondly, his house was opened by the Archbishop. Thirdly, he had been made a minister after he won the election. That is why he was considered rich and powerful.

The Voter Notes 2nd PUC KSEEB Solution Question 3.
Marcus Ibe had earlier been
a. doctor
b. schoolteacher
c. politician.
Answer:
(b) school teacher.

The Voter 2nd Puc Notes KSEEB Solution Question 4.
The fact that Marcus Ibe left the good things of the capital and returned to his village whenever he could, shows
a. his devotion to his people and love for the place
b. he enjoyed all the comforts of the city in his village.
c. he wanted to improve the amenities in his village.
Answer:
(b) he enjoyed all the comforts of the city in his village.

2nd Puc English Lesson The Voter Summary In English KSEEB Solution Question 5.
After the feasting, the villagers
a. praised Marcus’s faithfulness and generosity.
b. intended to demand more for their votes
c. realized Marcus’s wealth.
Answer:
(c) realized Marcus’s wealth.

Voter Notes 2nd PUC KSEEB Solution Question 6.
The ‘whispering campaign’ is
a. secret campaigning at night
b. bargaining for votes.
c. clandestine distribution of money.
Answer:
(c) clandestine distribution of money.

The Voter By Chinua Achebe Questions And Answers 2nd PUC KSEEB Solution Question 7.
The village eider Ezenwa tilted the lamp a little because
a. he could not see properly.
b. the place was too dark.
c. he wanted to confirm the amount paid to each.
Answer:
(c) he wanted to confirm the amount paid to each.

Question 8.
‘Firewood’ refers to
a. Roof taking advantage of the situation.
b. the advantages of being a voter.
c. the benefits the elders received.
Answer:
(c) the benefits the elders received.

Question 9.
Roof and the leader of the POP campaign team were
a. friends.
b. strangers.
c. acquaintances.
Answer:
(a, c) friends/acquaintances.

Question 10.
The roof was mesmerized by
a. the red notes on the floor.
b. the picture of the cocoa farmer.
c. the POP campaign leader.
Answer:
(a) the red notes on the floor.

Question 11.
Roof’s act of inserting the torn ballot papers in two boxes signifies
a. keeping his promise.
b. appeasing Iyi
c. absolving himself of his guilt
Answer:
(c) absolving himself of his guilt.

The Voter Comprehension II

Question 1.
Trace the change in the attitude of the villagers before the second election. Give reasons.
OR
Why did the people decide not to cast their vote for free in the forthcoming election?
OR
Explain the change that had come into the thinking of Umuofia in ‘The Voter’.
OR
Trace the reasons behind the ‘radical change’ that had come into the thinking ofUmuofia in ‘The Voter’.
Answer:
In this short story, Chinua Achebe makes an attempt to present before the reader how ‘elections’ lose their sanctity and are misused by greedy politicians for self-aggrandizement instead of bringing about improvement in the life of the people.

The people of Umuofia vote en masse in favor of the People’s Alliance Party and elect Marcus Ibe, a local teacher, as their leader. Once getting elected, people see a great many changes in Marcus’ life. Their elected representative becomes wealthy, is awarded chieftaincy titles and doctorate degrees, besides many other honours. He also builds a huge mansion in his native village and names it ‘Umuofia Mansions’. He spends most of his time in the capital and comes back to stay in his village mansion sometimes.

The villagers do not have running water and electricity, but he gets a private plant installed in his village to supply electricity to his new house. To top it all, his new house is opened by the Archbishop. On the day the new house is opened, he hosts a grand dinner to all the people of his village, slaughtering five bulls and countless goats. The common people realize that winning an election can change an ordinary mission school teacher into a wealthy and powerful man.

They also know that it is their ballot which has given him all those benefits. They recall that they had given their votes free of charge five years ago. They realize that they had underrated the power of the ballot paper and should not do so again. That is why, in the second election, they demand money for their votes.

Question 2.
What was the justification for the formation of the POP?
OR
What reasons are given for the formation of the POP?
Answer:
POP stands for Progressive Organisation Party. This party is formed by the tribes down the coast to save themselves from ‘totally political, cultural, social and religious annihilation’. The POP was a complete non-entity in the first election. Once the organizers come to know that there is no opposition party, some rich members of the tribes down the coast, form this party. They want the people to know that they will be paid pounds and not shillings if they listen to them and vote for them. In the story, we do not get any hint about the objectives of the PAP, but the organizers of the POP claim that they want to save the people from political, religious, cultural annihilation, though they appear to be no better.

From the situation described in the story, we can infer that the writer intends to tell the reader that no political party is seriously interested in improving the welfare of the people. They seem to know for sure that by winning an election, they can take the government in their hands and become rich. They seem to be unaware of their duties and responsibilities.

Question 3.
The roof is an intelligent manipulator. Justify with reference to the story,
OR
What is the role played by Roof in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
Roof Okeke is an energetic young man and has come back to his own village Umuofia, after working as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice for two years in Port Harcourt. It is true that he would have enjoyed a rich life if he had stayed on in his job. But he comes back to the village and tells the people that he wants to guide them in difficult times. Later he becomes an ’election campaign manager’ for Marcus Ibe and over a period of five years becomes an expert in election campaigning at all levels.

In the story, we get to know more about Roof when he is on the job, engaged in one of his whispering campaigns. He tells the elders that Marcus Ibe, being a ‘son’ from their village, has been made a minister and it should be considered a great honour. Then he tries to use his rationalistic thinking with the people. He asks them, “Do you ever stop to ask yourselves why we should be singled out for this honour?” He himself answers his question. He tells them that they are favoured by the PAP leaders. Here we see Roof as a manipulator at work. He knows for sure that Marcus was perhaps the only man with some education.

Secondly, there was no opposition party. Basically, the village folk were innocent and naive and hardly realized the meaning of an election and the value of their mandate. Roof exploits this situation to his advantage.

Moreover, when he comes to learn that people had understood the benefits of entering politics and winning an election as seen in the case of Marcus Ibe and are now planning not to give their vote free of charge, he immediately informs Marcus and keeps him prepared to pay some money to the people in exchange for their votes.

Finally, we get a clear picture of Roof as a manipulator when he accepts five pounds from the election manager of POR He makes sure that they will not disclose the news of his accepting the money. He also tries to keep his conscience clear by telling them that he works for Marcus; while putting his ballot paper into the box, he cleverly manages to cast his vote for both Marcus and Maduka, without attracting the wrath of ‘iyi’.

The Voter Comprehension III

Question 1.
The POP campaign leader’s meeting with Roof shows the misuse of transparency in a democratic setup. Discuss.
Answer:
In this story, Achebe satirizes ‘politicians’ and makes an attempt to show how even in a democratic setup election can become farcical.

Unlike in dictatorship or monarchy, in a democratic setup, people have the freedom to elect a ‘person’ to work as their representative in the government and work for their upliftment. One of the hallmarks of democracy is its insistence on transparency. Every person is subject to scrutiny by the public in the election process. A person is free to vote for a person of his choice from among the contestants. ‘Transparency’ in this refers to Roof’s informing the POP campaign leader that he is working for Marcus.

Secondly, whether Roof informs him or not, it is well known to everyone that Roof is Marcus’ election campaign manager. The candidates are permitted by law to make known to the people all such appointments and maintain transparency in their dealings.

However, no candidate can strike a deal with the people and buy their votes. But this is done clandestinely. The POP campaign leader knows that Roof is working for Marcus. Therefore, they want to buy Roof’s vote first so that they will let him know that the POP leaders will pay in pounds and not in shillings. This is the message they want to put across to the people through Roof. Probably, next time, Roof who has made a name as an efficient election campaign manager for Marcus, will be bold enough to demand ‘pounds’ instead of shillings from Marcus and if he refuses to pay in pounds, he might go and work for the POP leader. That way he will be able to motivate his people to vote for POP instead of the circus. Thus, the POP campaign managers’ meeting with Roof is daring misuse of transparency in a democratic setup.

Question 2.
To every human comes a time of reckoning. How does Roof’s dilemma on the day of the election reflect this?
OR
Why did Roof face a dilemma while he was inside the voting booth? How did he resolve it?
OR
“There comes a time in every man’s life to decide”. Explain with reference to ‘The Voter’.
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, Roof is an energetic young man who has the reputation of sacrificing a bright future for the sake of the people of his village. The roof has worked in a city for two years and has experience in dealing with both literates and illiterates. Based on this knowledge of general human behaviour, Roof builds for himself a career as an election campaign manager for Marcus Ibe.

When the story opens, we learn that Marcus Ibe is Chief the Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government and is seeking people’s mandate for a second term. We also learn that Marcus considers Roof a real expert in election campaigning at all levels. Roof knows how politicians make money. He also knows that the people of Umuofia have now decided to vote for Marcus for a price. Roof conveys this news to Marcus and prepares him beforehand.

Like an efficient manager, he tries to highlight the strong points of PAP and finally strike a bargain with the voters paying them four shillings per vote. Everything is now going according to his plan and is happy.

But, one evening, the leader of the POP campaign team comes to his house to meet him. He tempts Roof to vote for Maduka paying him five pounds. Roof’s greed tempts him to accept the offer. But, he also gets trapped. The leader asks him to swear on the ‘Iyi’, that he would vote for Maduka.

The roof cannot go back on his promise. So he swears to vote for Maduka. Finally, on the day of the voting, Marcus wants to make sure that every one of his people casts his vote without fail. Therefore, Roof being his election manager, Marcus sends him to the booth first to vote. Now, Roof is caught in a moral dilemma. All along he has worked for Marcus and his conscience does not permit him to cheat Marcus. Now, when Marcus asks him to cast his vote he is in two minds. He feels that he cannot betray Marcus. For a moment, his mind tells him that he should vote for Marcus and go back and return the money he had received from the POP election manager.

Secondly, he remembers that he had sworn on that ‘lyi’. In a few seconds, his mind hits on a new idea. He folds the ballot paper in the middle and tears it into two halves at the crease. He drops the first half into the box meant for Maduka and confirms his vote saying that he votes for Maduka. Since he has not taken an oath to vote for Marcus, there is no fear of ‘lyi’ in him but only his guilt. Since he has worked as his manager for money and rewards, he drops the other half into the box meant for Marcus. Thus, he ensures that he does not cheat either. By tearing the ballot paper and casting his vote for both of them he overcomes his moral dilemma.

Question 3.
What comment does the story offer on the electoral system? Is it relevant?
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, Achebe tries to present a true picture of the drama that is witnessed during an election held in a small town in Nigeria. There are two main characters and two political parties in the story and the voters are the villagers of Umuofia.

The roof is an energetic young man, who is now working as the election campaign manager for Marcus Ibe, who was once a local mission school teacher and was on the verge of dismissal from service on the basis of a female teacher’s complaint.

Marcus Ibe joins the People’s Alliance Party, contests the election, and gets elected. He becomes a minister and his government completes a five-year term and he is now seeking re-election. During his term as a minister, he amasses a lot of wealth, comes to own two big cars, builds a huge mansion in his native village, and wins several chieftaincy titles and doctorate degrees.

But his people remain the same – poor, illiterate, ignorant, and naive. The situation in his village also does not show any improvement. The same old problems of lack of running water and electricity continue to plague the people and prevent them from improving economically and politically. When the story opens, we learn that Marcus Ibe is seeking a second term and everyone is sure that he is going to get a landslide victory because there is no opposition party worth taking into consideration.

But there is a change in the perception of the people. After feasting in Marcus’ new house and noticing his wealth and power, the poor people of Umuofia realize that ‘elections’ do have a meaning and their votes which they had underrated before, are of high value. Therefore, they demand some value for their votes and Roof manages to convince them that they should vote for Marcus again by giving four shillings each.

Some tribes down the coast had set up a new political party called POP with the objective of saving the people from ‘totally political, cultural, social and religious annihilation’. Their campaign leader comes to Roof’s house and offers to buy his vote for five pounds. Roof initially is enamoured of the five-pound notes and agrees to vote.

But the POP leader cleverly gets him to swear on the ‘iyi’ that he will vote for Maduka. Finally, on election day, his conscience pricks him to a little extent and Roof feels like voting loyally for Marcus and returning the money to the POP election manager. But the oath he has taken before ‘iyi’ does not allow him to do so and there is a moral dilemma. However, Roof cuts his ballot paper in two, drops one half into the box meant for Maduka and drops the other half into the box meant for Marcus, and saves his conscience and his life too. This is the story in a nutshell.

There are lessons to learn from this story. We must note that merely naming our government as ‘democracy’ and setting up all the things needed for holding elections do not guarantee that people will be able to exercise their true mandate and will elect competent members to the government which will strive for the upliftment of the people socially, educationally, economically and culturally. We cannot guarantee democratic governance by merely holding elections regularly. First, we must educate the people about their rights, duties, and responsibilities in any election.

Secondly, we must ensure that people have the right to recall their representatives if they do not strive to improve a lot of people. Thirdly, elected representatives must be forced to account for their earnings after joining the government. Finally, there should be an authority which should oversee that sanctity of election procedures is not tampered with.

Also, those who get elected are self-centered and exploit the people and the situation to their benefit. On the whole, one can argue that by merely holding elections regularly we cannot ensure that a democratic government will come into place.

Secondly, the electoral system that is now in place in the story is not foolproof. As regards the relevance of the story to our own situation, one can argue that it is highly relevant even today. Even after nearly seven decades of independence, we have not been able to ensure free and fair elections, the main reason being the lack of education and moral values. We are witness to every type of corrupt practice in elections.

Question 4.
‘Democracy is more than holding elections regularly.’ Do you think the story supports this statement?
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, Achebe tries to present a true picture of the drama that is witnessed during an election held in a small town in Nigeria. There are two main characters and two political parties in the story and the voters are the villagers of Umuofia.
The roof is an energetic young man, who is now working as the election campaign manager for Marcus Ibe, who was once a local mission school teacher and was on the verge of dismissal from service on the basis of a female teacher’s complaint.

Marcus Ibe joins the People’s Alliance Party, contests the election, and gets elected. He becomes a minister and his government completes a five-year term and he is now seeking re-election. During his term as a minister, he amasses a lot of wealth, comes to own two big cars, builds a huge mansion in his native village, and wins several chieftaincy titles and doctorate degrees.

But his people remain the same – poor, illiterate, ignorant, and naive. The situation in his village also does not show any improvement. The same old problems of lack of running water and electricity continue t<3. plague the people and prevents them from improving economically and politically. When the story opens, we learn that Marcus Ibe is seeking a second term and everyone is sure that he is going to get a landslide victory because there is no opposition party worth taking into consideration.

But there is a change in the perception of the people. After feasting in Marcus’ new house and noticing his wealth and power, the poor people of Umuofia realize that ‘elections’ do have a meaning and their votes which they had underrated before, are of high value. Therefore, they demand some value for their votes and Roof manages to convince them that they should vote for Marcus again by giving four shillings each.

Some tribes down the coast had set up a new political party called POP with the objective of saving the people from ‘totally political, cultural, social and religious annihilation’. Their campaign leader comes to Roof’s house and offers to buy his vote for five pounds. Roof initially is enamoured of the five-pound notes and agrees to vote.

But the POP leader cleverly gets him to swear on the ‘iyi’ that he will vote for Maduka. Finally, on election day, his conscience pricks him to a little extent and Roof feels like voting loyally for Marcus and returning the money to the POP election manager. But the oath he has taken before ‘iyi’ does not allow him to do so and there is a moral dilemma. However, Roof cuts his ballot paper in two, drops one half into the box meant for Maduka and drops the other half into the box meant for Marcus, and saves his conscience and his life too. This is the story in a nutshell.

There are lessons to learn from this story. We must note that merely naming our government as ‘democracy’ and setting up all the things needed for holding elections do not guarantee that people will be able to exercise their true mandate and will elect competent members to the government which will strive for the upliftment of the people socially, educationally, economically and culturally. We cannot guarantee democratic governance by merely holding elections regularly. First, we must educate the people about their rights, duties, and responsibilities in any election.

Secondly, we must ensure that people have the right to recall their representatives if they do not strive to improve a lot of people. Thirdly, elected representatives must be forced to account for their earnings after joining the government. Finally, there should be an authority which should oversee that sanctity of election procedures is not tampered with.

Also, those who get elected are self-centred and exploit the people and the situation to their benefit. On the whole, one can argue that by merely holding elections regularly we cannot ensure that a democratic government will come into place. Secondly, the electoral system that is now in place in the story is not foolproof.

As regards the relevance of the story to our own situation, one can argue that it is highly relevant even today. Even after nearly seven decades of independence, we have not been able to ensure free and fair elections, the main reason being the lack of education and moral values. We are witness to every type of corrupt practice in elections.

The Voter Additional Questions and Answers

I. Answer the following questions in a word, a phrase, or a sentence each:

Question 1.
Where did Roof work as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice?
OR
What did Roof do in Port Harcourt?
Answer:
Roof worked as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice in Port Harcourt.

Question 2.
How long had Roof worked as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice?
Answer:
Roof worked as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice for two years.

Question 3.
The roof had given up being a bicycle repairer’s apprentice in order to
(a) contest elections
(b) guide his people
(c) campaign for Marcus.
Answer:
(b) and (c) guide his people/campaign for Marcus.

Question 4.
Who had formed the Progressive Organisation Party?
Answer:
The Progressive Organisation Party (POP) had been formed by the tribes down the coast.

Question 5.
To which village did Roof belong?
Answer:
To Umuofia.

Question 6.
Who was supposed to be very popular in his village?
Answer:
Roof.

Question 7.
According to the villagers, what was Roof’s motivation for leaving a promising career?
Answer:
The villagers believed that a strong desire to guide the people of Umuofia in difficult times was the motivation behind Roof’s leaving a promising career.

Question 8.
Which political party did the people of Umuofia support?
Answer:
People’s Alliance Party.

Question 9.
To which party did Marcus belong?
Answer:
To the People’s Alliance Party.

Question 10.
What was Marcus in the outgoing government?
Answer:
Minister of Culture.

Question 11.
Who did the Roof campaign for in the elections?
Answer:
For Marcus Ibe.

Question 12.
What was Marcus Ibe before he joined politics?
Answer:
A mission school teacher.

Question 13.
Why did Marcus Ibe face the threat of being dismissed from service as a school teacher?
Answer:
A female teacher had complained against Marcus Ibe. Hence, his dismissal was imminent.

Question 14.
What had Marcus named his new house?
Answer:
‘Umuofia Mansions’.

Question 15.
Who was the most trusted campaigner of Marcus?
Answer:
Roof.

Question 16.
How much salary had Marcus withdrawn in advance?
OR
How much had Marcus Ibe drawn in advance for the election?
Answer:
Five months’ salary.

Question 17.
How much did Marcus offer the people at first to vote for him?
Answer:
Two shillings to each voter.

Question 18.
How much did Marcus offer the people finally to vote for him?
OR
How many Shillings was finally accepted for the votes by the elders?
Answer:
Four shillings.

Question 19.
Who was the enemy Roof referred to when he spoke to the elders?
Answer:
The Progressive Organisation Party.

Question 20.
Who is the leader of the Progressive Organisation Party?
OR
Who had formed the POP?
Answer:
Maduka.

Question 21.
How much money did the POP offer Roof to vote for Maduka?
OR
How much does Roof get from the representatives of Maduka?
OR
How much did the POP campaign team offer Roof for his vote?
Answer:
Five pounds.

Question 22.
What was the election symbol of the People’s Alliance Party?
OR
What is the symbol used by Marcus in the election?
Answer:
A motor car.

Question 23.
What was the symbol of the Progressive Organisation Party?
Answer:
A man’s head.

Question 24.
What is ‘Umuofia Mansions’?
OR
Where did Marcus Ibe build his big mansion in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
‘Umuofia Mansions’ is the name of the biggest house in Umuofia, built by Marcus Ibe.

Question 25.
Where, on the election morning, did Marcus Ibe sit shaking hands with the villagers?
OR
Where was Marcus Ibe seated on the morning of the election?
Answer:
On the election morning, Marcus Ibe sat in the ‘owner’s corner’ of his enormous green car, shaking hands with the villagers.

Question 26.
What was Rufus Okeke called as?
OR
Who was addressed as Roof, for short?
Answer:
Rufus Okeke was called Roof for short by the people of his village.

Question 27.
What had Marcus promised the voters if he was elected in the forthcoming election?
OR
Mention the promise made by PAP if they were voted to power.
Answer:
Marcus had promised to give pipe-borne water to the village if he was elected in the forthcoming election.

Question 28.
Who competed against Marcus in the elections?
Answer:
Maduka, the leader of the POP, competed against Marcus in the elections.

Question 29.
What warning did Roof give Marcus about the coming elections?
Answer:
The roof had warned Marcus about the radical change that had come into the thinking of Umuofia since the last national election.

Question 30.
Why did Marcus Ibe join politics?
Answer:
Marcus had wisely joined politics just in time to avoid imminent dismissal arising from a female teacher’s complaint.

Question 31.
What does PAP stand for?
Answer:
PAP stands for the People’s Alliance Party.

Question 32.
What does POP stand for?
Answer:
POP stands for Progressive Organisation Party.

Question 33.
How much did Roof give the villagers to cast their votes for Marcus?
Answer:
The roof gave four shillings to each of the villagers to cast their votes for Marcus.

Question 34.
What was Roof made to swear on to ensure his vote for Maduka?
OR
What was Roof asked to swear on by the POP team?
Answer:
The roof was made to swear on the Iyi of Mbanta to ensure his vote for Maduka.

Question 35.
Who was PAP’s most illustrious son referred to in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
Marcus Ibe was PAP’s most illustrious son referred to in ‘The Voter’.

Question 36.
Who was the Minister of Culture in the outgoing government in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
Marcus Ibe was the Chief Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government mentioned in the voter.

Question 37.
Name the man of high traditional title in Umuofia mentioned in ‘The Voter’.
Answer:
Ogbuefi Ezenwa is the man of high traditional title in Umuofia mentioned in ‘The Voter’.

Question 38.
Mention one of the honours/benefits politics had brought to Marcus Ibe in ‘The Voter’.
Answer:
Some of the honours/benefits politics had brought to Marcus Ibe were wealth, chieftaincy titles, and doctorate degrees.

Question 39.
Opposition to Marcus Ibe in ‘The Voter’ was like
(a) a fly trying to move a dunghill.
(b) the bird challenging his personal spirit
(c) a mortar turning its back on the ground.
Answer:
(a) a fly trying to move a dunghill.

Question 40.
Who conducted the whispering campaign in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
Marcus Ibe’s stalwarts conducted the whispering campaign in ‘The Voter’.

Question 41.
The roof offered _____ shillings initially to the elders for their votes in ‘The Voter’.
(a) four
(b) two
(c) five
Answer:
(b) two.

Question 42.
Where does the iyi come from, according to the POP campaigner, in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
According to the POP campaigner in ‘The Voter’, the ‘iyi’ comes from Manta.

Question 43.
Whose election symbol was ‘man’s head’ in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, ‘Man’s head’ was the election symbol of the Progressive Organisation Party (POP).

Question 44.
What precaution did Roof take while inserting the ballot paper in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, while inserting the ballot paper, Roof took the precaution of putting the first half into Maduka’s box.

Question 45.
When did Marcus’s boys conduct whispering campaigns in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
In ‘The Voter’, Marcus’s boys conducted whispering campaigns at night.

Question 46.
How many elders were there when Roof conducted the whispering campaign in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
There were five elders besides Roof and his assistant when Roof conducted the whispering campaign in ‘The Voter’.

II. Answer the following questions in a paragraph of 80 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
The roof was a very popular man in his village. Give reasons.
Answer:
Roof Okeke was an energetic young man and had come back to his own village Umuofia, after working as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice for two years in Port Harcourt. It was true that he would have enjoyed a rich life if he had stayed on in his job. But he came back to the village and told the people that he wanted to guide them in difficult times. Later he became an ‘election campaign manager’ for Marcus Ibe and over a period of five years became an expert in election campaigning at all levels. Hence he was a very popular man in his village.

Question 2.
How did the POP campaign team trap Roof?
OR
Describe the meeting held by the POP campaign team with Roof in ‘The Voter’.
OR
Describe the meeting held by the POP campaign team with Roof in ‘The Voter’.
Answer:
In the story ‘The Voter’, Roof is the election campaign manager for Marcus Ibe, a candidate of the People’s Alliance Party. On the night before the election, the leader of the POP campaign team visits Roof’s house. He places five pounds on the floor and tells Roof that he wanted his vote. Initially, Roof did not know what to say or do. But, when he gets up from his chair, closes the door, and comes back, he gets enough time to weigh the proposition. He craves to make such a huge amount, his own.

However, his conscience pricks him and he tells in a feeble voice that the other person knows that he works for Marcus and it will be very bad on his part to accept a bribe, vote for Maduka, and deceive his own master. But when the other person tells him that Marcus will not know who he has voted for, Roof throws away his moral scruples to the wind and asks him whether anyone will talk about him outside. When he assures him that they are only interested in votes and not gossip, Roof’s greed tempts him to accept the offer. But, he also gets trapped. The leader asks him to swear on the Tyi’, that he would vote for Maduka. The roof cannot go back on his promise. So he swears to vote for Maduka.

Question 3.
Describe the last-minute election campaign in Umuofia.
OR
Give a picture of the activities on the election morning.
Answer:
On the day of the election, Chief the Honourable Marcus Ibe was doing things in a grand style. He had hired a highlife band from Umuru and stationed it at such a distance from the voting booths as just managed to be lawful. Many villagers danced to the music, their ballot papers held aloft, before proceeding to the booths. Marcus sat in the ‘owner’s corner’ of his enormous green car and smiled and nodded. Some villagers came up to the car, shook hands with the great man, and said in advance ‘Congrats!’

Roof and the other organizers were prancing up and down, giving last-minute advice to the voters and pouring with sweat. Roof tried to guide illiterate women saying “Our sign is the motor-car”. Then he told them, “Don’t look at the other with the man’s head: it is for those whose heads are not correct”. Finally, he shouted, “Vote for the car and you will ride in it!”

Question 4.
How is Roof’s dilemma brought out in ‘The Voter’?
OR
Roof’s dilemma on the day of the election is the result of his own misdeeds. Do you agree? Give reasons.
Answer:
On the day of the election, we see Roof in a moral dilemma. For the first time, his moral conscience pricks him not to betray Marcus. But it is only a momentary impulse and vanishes almost immediately when Roof recalls the picture of iyi and the cocoa farmer harvesting his crop. Then he hits on an idea of deceiving both Marcus and Maduka. He folds the ballot paper, tears it in two at the crease, and drops the first half into the box meant for Maduka and the other half into the box meant for Marcus. Thus, the writer successfully delineates how ‘money politics’ can corrupt people at all levels. It also reveals the contagious nature of an immoral attitude as the villagers who feel they “have climbed the iroko tree today and would be foolish not to take down all the firewood needed” blatantly ask for bribes.

It is Roof who is responsible for this moral degradation. The fall of Roof demonstrates the deepening level of corruption and the dimming of moral principles. Although Roof overcomes his personal dilemma on election day by tearing his ballot paper in two – one-piece for Maduka, the opponent, and one for Chief Marcus Ibe, his own employer his act illustrates the basic unreliability and political dishonesty of people working for elections. The plot of the story hinging on this man who bribes the electorate and who is bribed in turn drives home the deviant tendency of the political scene.

Question 5.
What changes did politics bring in Marcus Ibe?
OR
Describe how Marcus Ibe in ‘The Voter’ had managed to become a ‘successful’ politician.
OR
Everyone is full of praise for Marcus Ibe. What qualities and achievements attracted the people to praise him?
Answer:
Marcus Ibe was a not-too-successful mission school teacher. When he was almost on the verge of dismissal on the basis of a female teacher’s complaint, he joined politics, got elected as a representative of Umuofia, and was made Minister of Culture. People referred to him as Chief the Honourable Minister of Culture. In a period of five years Marcus became very wealthy, was given many chieftaincy titles and doctorate degrees and several other honours.

He got a huge mansion built in Umuofia and named it ‘Umuofia Mansions’ and got it opened by the Archbishop. On the day of the opening, he hosted a grand lunch to the people of his village slaughtering five bulls and countless goats. After feasting in his house, people were full of praise for him. They opined that he was a great man and does his things like a great man. He also owned two big cars.

Question 6.
Account for Roof’s popularity in ‘The Voter’.
OR
The roof was a very popular man in his village. Give reasons.
Answer:
Rufus Okeke, called Roof for short, was a very popular man in his village. His popularity was due to the fact that even after spending two years as a bicycle apprentice in Port Harcourt, Roof had come back to Umuofia of his own free will with the intention of guiding his people in difficult times. If he had stayed on in his job he would have enjoyed a rich life. By this gesture, he wins the gratitude and admiration of his people.

Question 7.
What was the whispering campaign and how did Roof conduct it in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
A ‘whispering campaign’ refers to secret meetings held between the group of elders of a village and the election campaign manager of a political party. The election manager goes to such campaigns armed with money bags and woos the voters offering money for votes.

In ‘The Voter’, Roof, the most trusted campaigner of the PAP, conducted a whispering campaign in the house of Ogbuefi Ezenwa, a man of the high traditional title. Initially, Roof tried to kindle the pride of the people telling them that the PAP had made Marcus Ibe, one of their own sons, Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government, and offered them 2 shillings each initially. But, Ezenwa rejected it saying that two shillings were shameful and Marcus was a great man, who did his things like a great man. Later, when Roof offered them 2 more shillings each, they accepted it and agreed to cast their vote for Marcus Ibe. Thus, Roof conducted his whispering campaign.

Question 8.
Why was Roof in a fix when putting in his ballot paper, in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
As soon as Roof went into the voting booth, he was confronted by the ‘car’ on one box and the ‘head’ on the other. He took out his ballot paper from his pocket and looked at it. For a moment he found himself caught in a moral dilemma. He could not decide whether he should vote for Marcus Ibe of the PAP or Maduka of POP.

As the election campaign manager for Marcus Ibe, he had worked enthusiastically urging the people to vote for PAP. He had also taken a lot of money and other gifts for his service. But, now he had put himself in a fix because he had accepted five pounds from the POP and had sworn before the ‘iyi’ that he would vote for Maduka. So he did not want to cheat, because his fear of ‘iyi’ from Mbanta troubled him seriously. On the other hand, he felt guilty for betraying Marcus Ibe. For a moment he felt like going back to the campaign manager and returning his five pounds.

Finally, the moment he thought of the red notes, he visualized the cocoa farmer busy at work and his swearing on that ‘iyi’. Therefore, he folded the ballot paper, tore it into two along the crease, and put one half in each box. He put the first half into Maduka’s box confirming his action verbally, “1 vote for Maduka”.

Question 9.
Trace the behaviour of Roof on the day of voting.
Answer:
On the day of the election, Roof appears to be seriously interested in ensuring that the voters know who to vote for and how to exercise their choice. Along with others Roof prances up and down giving last-minute advice to the voters. As soon as the first rush of voters is over, Marcus promptly asks his campaign boys to go one at a time and put in their ballot papers. He asks Roof to go first. Roof’s spirits fall, but he lets no one see it. Roof dashes off in his springy fashion towards the booth.

When Roof goes into the booth, he faces a moral dilemma. But he overcomes his moral dilemma, cuts the vote into two, and drops the two halves in the boxes, one half for Marcus and the other half for Maduka. While coming out, he looks as happy as he was when he went in. Thus, by putting on a happy face and walking with a lot of energy in his gait while going into the booth as well as while coming out of the booth, Roof is able to conceal his betrayal of Marcus in the election.

III. Answer the following questions in about 200 words each:

Question 1.
Do you think Roof is right in tearing the ballot paper into two? Explain.
OR
Do you agree or disagree with how Roof resolves his dilemma regarding how to cast his
vote?
OR
In the story, Roof has to make a difficult decision about how to cast his vote. Do you agree with the way he resolves this dilemma? Why or why not?
OR
Why does Roof tear the ballot paper into two?
Answer:
The main focus of Achebe in ‘The Voter’ is the satirisation of money politics and the contagious nature of corruption. Roof, the protagonist of the story, is an energetic young man of Umuofia, who has come back to his village giving up a bright future in the city. People believe that he has come back to guide them in difficult times and so hold him in high esteem.

The village Umuofia already belonged en masse to the People’s Alliance Party and had elected Chief the Honourable Marcus Ibe as their representative in the previous election and nobody doubted his re-election this time also. The man behind Marcus’ success is Roof. He was his election campaign manager and had become a real expert in election campaigning at all levels.

But towards the end of the story, we see that Roof is offered five pounds by the leader of the election campaign for a POP on condition that Roof votes for Maduka. A roof does not hesitate at all but tries to tell them that he is working for Marcus. But they allay his fears telling him that Marcus will not be there to watch him when he drops his vote in the box. Roof accepts their offer and swears to vote for Maduka in the presence of ‘iyi’.

On the day of the election, Marcus wants to make sure that every one of his people votes for him. Therefore, he asks Roof to cast his vote first. When Roof goes into the booth, he faces a moral dilemma. His conscience tells him that he ought not to betray Marcus. There is an impulse in him to run to the leader of the POP election campaign manager and return his money. But, when he recalls that he had sworn to vote for Maduka in the presence of ‘iyi’, he changes his decision in a split second and folds the ballot paper in two. He tears it into two halves and drops the first half into the box meant for Maduka and the other half into Marcus’ box. He also confirms his vote for Maduka by saying aloud, “I vote for Maduka”, and then goes out happily.

This act of Roof, of tearing the ballot in two, invalidates his vote. When a person tears it in two, it is clear that he has not chosen any person at all, though he may have dropped the two halves of the paper into different boxes. When Roof tears the ballot paper in two it is only to resolve the moral dilemma he is facing and not with the intention of exercising his choice. If he puts two halves in two different boxes, it does not mean that he has voted in favour of both. Actually it is an invalid vote. This is against the spirit of elections and is condemnable.

Question 2.
How does Roof conceal his betrayal of Marcus in the election? Elucidate.
Answer:
On the day of the election, Roof appears to be seriously interested in ensuring that the voters know who to vote for and how to exercise their choice. Along with others Roof prances up and down giving last-minute advice to the voters and pouring with sweat. As soon as the first rush of voters is over, Marcus promptly asks his campaign boys to go one at a time and put in their ballot papers. He asks Roof to go first. Roof’s spirits fall, but he lets no one see it. Roof dashes off in his springy fashion towards the booths. When Roof goes into the booth, he faces a moral dilemma.

But he overcomes his moral dilemma, cuts the vote into two, and drops the two halves in the boxes, one half for Marcus and the other half for Maduka. While coming out, he looks as happy as he was when he went in. Thus, by putting on a happy face and walking with a lot of energy in his gait while going into the booth as well as while coming out of the booth, Roof is able to conceal his betrayal of Marcus in the election.

Question 3.
Give an account of Roof’s role as an election campaigner.
OR
The roof is an expert election campaigner. Substantiate the statement.
Answer:
The roof is an energetic young man of Umuofia, who has come back to his village giving up a bright future in the city. People believe that he has come back to guide them in difficult times and hence hold him in high esteem. When we read about the election, the writer tells us that the village of Umuofia already belonged en masse to the People’s Alliance Party and had elected Chief the Honourable Marcus Ibe as their representative in the previous election and nobody doubted his re-election this time also. The man behind Marcus’ success is Roof.

The roof was his election campaign manager and had become a real expert in election campaigning at all levels. Having already seen a change in Marcus’ status and wealth, Roof is able to gauge the people’s mood and the change in people’s perception of Marcus Ibe and had conveyed to his leader that a radical change had come in them. This way he prepares Marcus to plan his strategy to woo the voters in the coming elections.

After feasting in Marcus’ house on the day of the opening of his new house, people had realized what good things politics had showered on Marcus. They also regretted to a little extent that they had given their vote to Marcus free of charge in the previous election. Therefore, this time, they decided to demand a price for their vote. As expected, Roof, being an expert in election campaigning, comes armed with money to his whispering campaigns.

During his whispering campaigns, Roof uses a lot of political rhetoric and tells the people convincingly that PAP favours the people of Umuofia. He says, “What greater honour can a village have? Do you ever stop to ask yourselves why we should be singled out for this honour? Think of the pipe-borne water they have promised us …” This way Roof manages to mesmerize the naive people into believing that Marcus is a great man and is going to do great things for their village.

Besides, Roof satisfies their desire for a share of Marcus’ earnings by giving them four shillings each. On the day of the election, Marcus entertains the people hiring a highlife band from Umuru. He sits in an enormous car and tries to impress the people with his wealth and eminence. He coins catchy slogans like ‘Vote for the car, and you will ride in it’. It is these strategies planned by Roof that ensure Marcus’ victory in the elections.

Question 4.
‘The Voter’ ridicules the power and selfishness of Marcus Ibe. Explain.
Answer:
‘The Voter’ highlights what kind of people become people’s leaders, how politics bestows wealth and power on them, and because of such people how elections become farcical. The two main characters in the story are Marcus and Roof, and the voters are the people of Umuofia. The whole focus of the plot is to ridicule greedy and selfish politicians and to show how they manage to corrupt the society also.

Marcus was a not-too-successful mission school teacher. When he was almost on the verge of dismissal on the basis of a female teacher’s complaint, he joined politics, got elected as a representative of Umuofja, and was made Minister of Culture. In about five years, people see a great many changes in Marcus’ life. Their elected representative becomes wealthy, is awarded chieftaincy titles and doctorate degrees besides many other honours. He also builds a huge mansion in his native village.

In a satirical tone, the writer says that Marcus had christened his new house ‘Umuofia Mansions’ in honour of his village and had slaughtered five bulls and countless goats to entertain the people on the day it was opened by the Archbishop. Marcus believed that, by entertaining people thus, people would respect him and would hold him in high esteem.

But the people are not naive and ignorant. They know where his ‘power’ and money come from. The people know that he had acquired all this only after they had elected him their representative giving their votes free of charge five years ago. Even after five years, the people and their village remained the same as before but Marcus had changed completely.

When Roof tells Marcus that a radical change had come into the thinking of Umuofia since the last election, like any other corrupt politician Marcus prepares himself to bribe the people. The people come prepared to demand their share of his wealth. Instead of demanding developmental work for their village, the people tell Roof that two shillings are too shameful and settle the deal for four shillings each. It is Marcus and Roof who blatantly offer money, tacitly admitting that they have used the public money selfishly for their own development, that the voter ridicules them by demanding more money for their vote, sending the message that real power to change the face of a village, town or country is in the hands of the voter and not selfish politicians like Marcus.

Question 5.
‘Roof was the most trusted of the whispering campaigners’. To what extent is this true in ‘The Voter’?
OR
To what extent was Roof the most trusted of the whispering campaigners in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
When the story opens, we learn that Marcus is seeking re-election as a representative of Umuofia. Secondly, we also know that it was Roof who had worked for his success in the previous election. As a trusted whispering campaign manager of Marcus, he had been able to convince the people of Umuofia that Marcus would work for the welfare of the people and they would get many amenities like running water and electricity. Then, he had worked hard to get Marcus elected and had kindled the expectations of the people.

But, during the five years as people’s representative, Marcus proved to everyone how joining politics can be lucrative. He had also given gifts to Roof to retain him as his election campaigner for the coming election also. However, Roof was clever enough to perceive a change in the mood of the people and warned Marcus about it. That is why, in the whispering campaign, he goes armed with money bags to woo the voters.

Until the last day of the campaigning, Roof remains loyal and the most trusted of Marcus’ whispering campaigners. But, the visitor from POP cleverly lures Roof to promise his vote for Maduka offering a huge sum of money. It is at this juncture that we see a dent in his loyalty towards Marcus. Even though he knows that a half ballot paper is invalid as a person’s mandate, he tears the vote in two and puts one half into each box, thus resolving the moral dilemma in his mind. This way he is only comforting his conscience and does not remain functionally loyal to Marcus.

Question 6.
Do you think ‘the voter’ is right in demanding money to vote for Marcus Ibe? Explain.
Answer:
The people of Umuofia give their mandate to Marcus and get him elected as their representative believing that he would work for their welfare and upliftment. However, as his term rolls by, they witness a substantial change in Marcus’ status and wealth, while the people’s status remains the same. People realize how politics can make someone rich and powerful. They regret that they had underrated the power of their mandate, and so decide to demand a share of his earnings to cast their vote.

That is why, in the whispering campaign, when Roof offers each one of the two shillings, they tell him that it was too shameful to accept just two shillings from Marcus for their vote because Marcus was no longer a poor man and was doing great things like a great man. Then they agree to cast their vote taking four shillings each.

An election process in any democratic set up has high intrinsic value because it symbolizes people’s mandate and the elected representative becomes the voice of those people. Naturally, when the voters of Umuofia demand money to vote for Marcus, it only means that their real mandate has not given them what they needed and they remain in abject poverty as before. They have lost faith in elections as a means to achieve their welfare. The previous election may have failed them but they ought not to become corrupted. That will pave the way for further deterioration by building obstacles in the path to their own development. They are not right in demanding money.

Question 7.
‘The Voter’ is a comment on the awareness of voters. Discuss.
Answer:
In the story ‘The Voter’, Chinua Achebe satirizes ‘politicians’ and makes an attempt to show how even in a democratic setup election can become farcical because of ignorance, illiteracy, and corruption. The story also highlights how deep-rooted corruption in society can be.

Marcus Ibe, who was once a local mission school teacher, was now Chief the Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government. During his term as a minister, he had amassed a lot of wealth. Thus, ‘politics’ had brought about a great change in the life of Marcus and Roof as well. But, the people of Umuofia had remained the same – poor, illiterate, ignorant, and naive – and their villages remained dry and wretched without even the basic amenities.

Marcus, who is seeking a second term, is sure that he is going to get a landslide victory because of the absence of any strong opposition party worth taking into consideration. But, this time, there is a change in the perception of the people. After feasting in Marcus’ new house and noticing the increase in his wealth and power, the poor people of Umuofia realize that elections do have a meaning and it is during elections that their votes have value.

They also know that it is ‘politics’ that has brought wealth and power to Marcus. They strike a bargain with Roof and agree to sell their vote for four shillings each. This way, the people of Umuofia shed their moral scruples and make up their minds to be satisfied with just a little share of the thief’s booty. Eventually, it is this strain in the people’s minds that helps a corrupt politician like Marcus to win elections with the least resistance.

Like Marcus, Roof also realizes how people’s elected representatives can become rich in a very short time. Having worked as his election manager, Roof extracts enough money as well as other benefits from Marcus during his first term. In the second term. Roof’s greed for wealth is kindled by another political party – the POR They know that it is Roof’s expertise in election campaigning that woos the voters of Umuofia and Roof is amply compensated by Marcus for his efforts.

The POP, with a view to making a dent in Marcus’ electorate, lures Roof with an offer of five pounds just to cast his vote for Maduka. Their intention is only to win over Roof to their side with the’ promise that he can make much more money from POP than from PAP. Once Roof bites the bait, they ensure that he is in their clutches, by forcing him to swear on the ‘iyi’. Though Roof is caught in a dilemma, he solves the conflict in his mind by tearing the ballot paper into two and casting his vote for both parties.

Thus, both the episodes prove how ‘corruption’ can ruin both the literate and the illiterate, the educated and the uneducated, and make democratic processes ineffective and farcical. The voters, who have been given the power to elect a leader who can help them improve their lives, use the very process of election to settle for a pittance and build obstacles in the path to their own development. This way they make a mockery of the electoral system.

Question 8.
Demanding money to vote for a particular person is not wrong. How is this brought out in ‘The Voter’?
Answer:
‘The Voter’, a short story by Chinua Achebe, happens in a village called Umuofia. It is a satirical and realistic portrayal of how corrupt politicians deceive people in elections and what mediatory strategies they use to woo the voters and subvert the power of the people’s mandate in choosing a leader df their choice. Incidentally, the author also seems to question the very basis of societal and ethical norms, socio-economic conditions of the people, moral decadence, etc. The corrupt and greedy political leader in the story is Marcus Ibe.

He is the Chief Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government and is seeking re-election as a candidate of the PAR Soon after becoming the minister, Marcus had made use of his political status for his self-aggrandizement. In a period of five years, he had managed to amass a great deal of wealth, power, status, and public adulation. He had two long cars and had just built himself the biggest house in those parts. To top it all, on the day of the opening of his mansion, Marcus Ibe held a grand banquet for the people of the village slaughtering five bulls and countless goats. Thus, politics had made him richer.

On the other hand, the status of the people remained the same. They lived in abject poverty without even the basic amenities like electricity and drinking water. Though they had been watching how politics had brought wealth and power to Marcus, it had not dawned on them that it was the power of their vote which had given him all the comforts. After the feasting was over, the villagers told themselves that they had underrated the power of the ballot paper before and should not do it again. His election manager Roof was shrewd enough to understand the change in the attitude of the people. Therefore, he went to the whispering campaign armed with money and successfully bought their vote paying four shillings each to the leaders.

The question that arises now, is, whether demanding money to vote for a particular person is right? The author seems to argue that as long as politicians in a democratic set up fulfill their promises to the people and take care of their welfare, the question of buying votes does not arise at all. When politicians themselves flout all democratic norms and ideals and work only for their aggrandizement, there is nothing wrong with people demanding some value for their votes. This is brought out clearly in the story.

Ezenwa, the highest traditional title holder, says, “Marcus is a great man and does his things like a great man. We did not ask him for money yesterday; we shall not ask him tomorrow. But today is our day; we have climbed the iroko tree today and would be foolish not to take down all the firewood we need”. Thus, one can rightly conclude that demanding money to vote for a particular person is not wrong.

Question 9.
‘The Voter’ presents the role of money and ridicules its power in an election. Explain.
Answer:
‘The Voter’, a short story by Chinua Achebe, happens in a village called Umuofia. It is a satirical and realistic portrayal of how corrupt politicians deceive people in elections and what mediatory strategies they use to woo the voters and subvert the power of the people’s mandate in choosing a leader df their choice. Incidentally, the author also seems to question the very basis of societal and ethical norms, socio-economic conditions of the people, moral decadence, etc. The corrupt and greedy political leader in the story is Marcus Ibe. He is the Chief Honourable Minister of Culture in the outgoing government and is seeking re-election as a candidate of the PAR Soon after becoming the minister, Marcus had made use of his political status for his self-aggrandizement.

In a period of five years, he had managed to amass a great deal of wealth, power, status, and public adulation. He had two long cars and had just built himself the biggest house in those parts. To top it all, on the day of the opening of his mansion, Marcus Ibe held a grand banquet for the people of the village slaughtering five bulls and countless goats. Thus, politics had made him richer.

On the other hand, the status of the people remained the same. They lived in abject poverty without even the basic amenities like electricity and drinking water. Though they had been watching how politics had brought wealth and power to Marcus, it had not dawned on them that it was the power of their vote which had given him all the comforts. After the feasting was over, the villagers told themselves that they had underrated the power of the ballot paper before and should not do it again. His election manager Roof was shrewd enough to understand the change in the attitude of the people. Therefore, he went to the whispering campaign armed with money and successfully bought their vote paying four shillings each to the leaders.

The question that arises now, is, whether demanding money to vote for a particular person is right? The author seems to argue that as long as politicians in a democratic set up fulfill their promises to the people and take care of their welfare, the question of buying votes does not arise at all. When politicians themselves flout all democratic norms and ideals and work only for their aggrandizement, there is nothing wrong with people demanding some value for their votes.

This is brought out clearly in the story. Ezenwa, the highest traditional title holder, says, “Marcus is a great man and does his things like a great man. We did not ask him for money yesterday; we shall not ask him tomorrow. But today is our day; we have climbed the iroko tree today and would be foolish not to take down all the firewood we need”. Thus, one can rightly conclude that demanding money to vote for a particular person is not wrong.

The Voter Vocabulary

Use suitable prefixes to form antonyms:
A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word. Adding it to the beginning of one word changes it into another word.
Prefix – In-, Un-, Im-, Dis-

Question 1.

  1. Gratitude
  2. Certain
  3. Install
  4. Personal
  5. Honour
  6. Disputed
  7. Correct
  8. Mask
  9. Lawful
  10. Grateful
  11. Wavering
  12. Regard
  13. Perturbed
  14. Tolerant.

Answer:

  1. Ingratitude
  2. Uncertain
  3. Uninstall
  4. Impersonal
  5. Dishonour
  6. Undisputed
  7. Incorrect
  8. Unmask
  9. Unlawful
  10. Ungrateful
  11. Unwavering
  12. Disregard
  13. Unperturbed
  14. Intolerant.

Additional Exercises

A. Passive Voice:

Question 1.
The roof was a young man. He ______ (know) to everyone in Umuofia. The POP campaigner met him at night. No words _____ (waste) between them. Roof _____ (give) five pounds to vote for Maduka.
Answer:
was known; were wasted; was given.

Question 2.
Marcus Ibe was the PAP candidate. He ______ (warn) about the radical change in the thinking of Umuofia. So five months’ salary _______ (draw) in advance. His campaign boys _____ (arm) with eloquent little jute bags.
Answer:
was warned; was drawn; were armed.

Question 3.
Marcus Ibe was extremely generous to Roof. He ______ (ask) to lend one of his many robes by Roof. When Marcus Ibe’s wife objected, she ______ (rebuke) publicly by him. Roof won a land case because he _____ (drive) by a chauffeur to the disputed site.
Answer:
was asked; was rebuked; was driven.

Question 4.
The roof received a strange visit from the POP campaigner. Though the campaigner and Roof ______ (know) to each other, his visit was cold and business-like. No words _____ (exchange) between them. When the visitor placed five pounds on the floor, Roof ______ (mesmerize) by the picture of the cocoa farmer.
Answer:
were known; were exchanged; was mesmerized.

Question 5.
Marcus was doing things in a grand style. A high life band from Umuru ______ (hire) by him and it ______ (station) at a distance from the voting booth. Marcus sat in his car when last-minute advice ______ (give) to voters by Roof and others.
Answer:
had been hired; was stationed; was given.

Question 6.
The man nudged his companion and he brought forward an object that ______ (cover) with a red cloth. It was a fearsome little affair. It _____ (keep) in a clay pot and feathers ______ (stick) into it.
Answer:
was covered; was kept; were stuck.

B. Report the following conversation:

Question 1.
Roof: I work for Marcus Ibe.
POP campaigner: We have plenty of work to do tonight Are you taking this or not?
Roof: Will it not be heard outside this room?
POP campaigner: We are after votes, not gossip.
Answer:
Roof informed the POP campaigner that he worked for Marcus Ibe. The POP campaigner remarked that they had plenty of work to do that night. He further asked Roof whether he was taking that or not. Roof asked cautiously whether it would be heard outside that room. The POP campaigner stated that they were after votes and not gossip.

Question 2.
Roof: Do not forget. Our sign is the motor-car.
Woman: Is it like Marcus’s car?
Roof: It is the same car. Don’t look at the other with the man’s head.
Answer:
Roof implored the woman not to forget that their sign was the motor-car. The woman wanted to know whether it was like Marcus’s car. Roof replied that it was the same car. He also asked the woman not to look at the other with the man’s head.

Question 3.
POP campaigner: The iyi comes from Mbanta. Swear on it.
Roof: I will cast my paper for Maduka. But Maduka has no chance against Marcus.
POP campaigner: Maduka gives out pounds, not shillings.
Answer:
The POP campaigner informed Roof that the iyi came from Mbanta. He asked him to swear on that. Roof told him that he would cast his paper for Maduka. But he added that Maduka had no chance against Marcus. In response, the POP campaigner remarked that Maduka gave out pounds, and not shillings.

C. Fill in the blanks by choosing the appropriate expressions given in brackets:

Question 1.
Marcus knew that he would win but didn’t want _______ a single vote. So he asked his campaign boys to go one at a time and put in their ballot papers. At this time Roof was weighed down by guilt but pretended ______. (to be in high spirits, to throw away, pass by)
Answer:
to throw away; to be in high spirits.

Question 2.
The roof was ______ as he had sworn on iyi that he would vote for Maduka. However, on the day of the election, he wanted to hide it. Therefore he did not ______ his calm and confidence. (give up, face lit up, in a fix)
Answer:
in a fix; give up.

Question 3.
In Umuofia, everyone was _____ for Marcus Ibe. He was not like the mortar which as soon as food comes its way ____ on the ground. (looks down at, turns it is back, full of praise)
Answer:
full of praise; turns its back.

Question 4.
It was the time of the election. The campaign in Umuofia was ____. All knew that the honourable minister would have a _____. (in a soup, landslide victory, in full swing)
Answer:
in full swing; landslide victory.

Question 5.
The roof was disturbed on the morning of the election. Suddenly a thought _______ his mind and he _______ in his springy fashion towards the booth. (leapt into, gave out, dashed off)
Answer:
leapt into; dashed off.

Question 6.
Roof’s heart nearly ______ when he saw the iyi. Indeed he knew the fame of Mbanta in these things. What could a single vote cast in secret for Maduka ______ from Marcus’s certain victory? (get a few, few out, take away)
Answer:
flew out; take away.

D. Fill in the blanks with the appropriate linkers:

Question 1.
The roof was a young and energetic man. He never left his village _______ to seek work in the towns _____ decided to remain to guide his people. _____ he was very popular. ______ he was an expert in election campaigning. (moreover, but, in order to, so)
Answer:
in order to; but; So; Moreover.

Question 2.
Everything was moving according to the plan. ______ Roof had received a strange visit from the leader of the POP campaign team. ______ he and Roof were well-known ______ might even be called friends, the visit was business-like. He placed five pounds on the floor before Roof. ______ Roof spoke, his eyes never left the red notes on the floor. (and, although, then, as)
Answer:
Then; Although; and; As.

Question 3.
The roof was a very popular man in his village. ______ the villagers did not explain it in so many words, Roof’s popularity was a measure of their gratitude to an energetic young man ______ unlike most of his fellows nowadays, had not abandoned the village _____ seek any work in the towns. And Roof was not a village lout ______. (who, although, either, in order to)
Answer:
Although; who; in order to; either.

Question 4.
Roof’s heart nearly flew out _____ he saw the iyi ______ he knew the fame of Mbanta well. ____ he was certain that a single vote would not defeat Marcus. _____ he agreed to swear on the iyi. (hence, when, however, as)
Answer:
when; as; However; Hence.

The Voter by Chinua Achebe About the Writer:

Chinua Achebe (1930-2013) is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic. Achebe’s novels focus on the traditions of Igbo society, the effect of Christian influences, and the clash of Western and traditional African values during and after the colonial era. His style relies heavily on the Igbo oral tradition and combines straightforward narration with representations of folk stories, proverbs, and oratory. He also published a number of short stories, children’s books, and essay collections. Some of his works are: ‘Things Fall Apart’, ‘Arrow Of God’, ‘No Longer At Ease’,’ Enemy Of The People’ and ‘Girls At War’.

The Voter Summary in English

In this short story, Achebe offers a satirical picture of how politics and elections generally work in modern African countries like Nigeria.

The protagonist of the story is Rufus Okeke – Roof for short. The majority of the Igbo people in the village are illiterate, backward, and poor. Though the administration of the town is in the hands of a democratic government comprising elected representatives of the people, the people have not yet realized the value of their mandate and are also not yet aware of their rights. It is election time now. The ruling party PAP (People’s Alliance Party) is seeking re-election. There is hardly any other party to obstruct or prevent the re-election of the existing government. One important aspect of this election is the re-election of Marcus Ibe, who is Minister of Culture in the outgoing government. The only other party, which appears to be a non-entity until now, is the POP – Progressive Organisation Party, and Maduka is its representative. The POP is making a strong attempt to garner some votes in its favour.

The focus of the author seems to be to capture the human drama in which a poor, pathetically innocent and naive people make a brave attempt to derive some monetary benefit during the election from a prospective candidate using the mediatory strategies of a literate young man of their town in when they have reposed a great deal of trust.

However, the crux of the plot is how this very same trusted representative of the people manages to strike a rich bargain with the opposition party as well and yet remain loyal to both the parties.

When the story opens, we are introduced to Rufus Okeke. He is a very popular man in the village. His popularity is due to the fact that unlike people of his age, Roof has not abandoned his village seeking work in the towns. Secondly, he is also not a village lout. People like him because they believe that he has given up a bright future and come back to their village on his own after spending two years as a bicycle repairer’s apprentice in Port Harcourt with the intention of guiding the people of the village.

In the next stage, the author tells us about the voters and the government. We learn that the whole village had voted en masse in favour of the People’s Alliance Party and elected Honourable Marcus Ibe of their village, who had become Minister of Culture in the outgoing government. The author tells us in a satirical tone that Marcus Ibe was sure to be re-elected because there was hardly any other opposition party worth considering. From this situation, the reader can infer the predicament of the innocent people pitted against greedy and power-thirsty politicians. In a tone veiled in mild satire, the author says that Roof, the trusted representative of the people of Umuofia, was working as the election campaign manager for the Honourable Minister Marcus Ibe, who was seeking re-election from Umuofia.

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The roof was more intelligent and cleverer than the common people of Umuofia. He had become a real expert in election campaigning at all levels – village, local government or national, that is why he was able to gauge the mood and temper of the electorate at any given time. This time, he has been intelligent enough to warn Marcus Ibe that a radical change has come into the thinking of the people in Umuofia since the last election. Thus he kindles the interest of the reader.

The villagers had come to realize that in five years, politics had brought wealth, chieftaincy titles, doctorate degrees and other honours readily to the man whom they had given their votes free of charge five years ago. It is also a paradox that the people who had empowered a person to enjoy such benefits themselves remained poor and ignorant. They did not even know that a doctorate degree holder is not a medical doctor. Anyhow, the people were now ready to try the value of their votes in a different way.

The author then narrates the expectations of the people in Umuofia. The people had now witnessed the ‘good’ things done by politics to their own elected representative Marcus Ibe. Before getting elected, he was only a fairly successful mission school teacher and was on the verge of getting dismissed on the basis of a female teacher’s complaint. Just at that moment, politics had come to their village and at that opportune moment Marcus Ibe had wisely joined up. By doing so he had escaped dismissal.

Secondly, he got elected and became ‘Chief the Honourable’ in the government. Consequently, he got two long cars and had built himself the biggest house in that village. But, he remained a devoted leader of his people. In a satirical tone, the author says that whenever he could, he left the good things of the capital and returned to his village which had neither running water nor electricity, but he had lately installed a private plant to supply electricity to his new house in the village. The writer comments that Marcus knew the source of his good fortune hinting that it is the people of Umuofia who are responsible for his prosperity.

Marcus Ibe had christened his new house ‘Umuofia Mansions’ in honour of his village and on the day the house was opened, he had hosted a grand lunch to his people slaughtering five bulls and countless goats. Moreover, the house was opened by the Archbishop. Thus the writer gives a rosy picture of the eminence and prosperity of Marcus which politics had bestowed on him.

The author describes the reactions of the people of Umuofia after they had enjoyed Marcus’s hospitality. There is subtle irony in the description. The people are full of praise for Marcus’ hospitality. But, they also know that Marcus owes his riches to his getting elected and joining the government. We can perceive a tone of regret when the people conclude after the feasting was over that they had underrated the power of the ballot paper earlier and that they should not do it again. This is the radical change in people’s attitude towards casting their ballot paper in an election free of charge without expecting any benefits.

Since Roof had already warned Marcus Ibe about it, Marcus had also taken suitable measures to meet the expectations of the people. “He had drawn five months’ salary in advance and changed a few hundred pounds into shining shillings and had armed his campaign boys with eloquent little jute bags”. Having sensed that the people of Umuofia will not cast their ballot paper in his favour, free of cost, Marcus had sent money to bribe and persuade the voters to vote for him. The contesting candidate would make his speeches in the morning and at night his expert election managers would conduct their whispering campaign.

Here ‘whispering campaign’ refers to the way election managers visit voters’ houses in the evening after sunset and tell the voters about the prospect of their candidate becoming minister. Thereby they appeal to people’s self-esteem and the honour that is going to be bestowed on their town and finally bribe them into casting their vote in favour of their political party.

We see how the radical change in people brings about a change in the nature of the election process and affects the sanctity of the people’s mandate.

We witness a whispering campaign conducted by Roof in the house of Ogbuefi Ezenwa, a man of the high traditional title. Roof addresses a group of elders and tells them that his party PAP has made a man of their village a minister in the outgoing government. Roof tries to argue that it is a great honour for one of their sons to be singled out for this honour. Then he tells them that PAP leaders look upon Umuofia with a favourable attitude and whether they cast their vote in his favour or not, PAP will form the government. He also tries to hint at the promise made by PAP to the people of Umuofia that they will give pipe-borne water to their village.

After Roof had finished talking, Ogbuefi Ezenwa spoke to Roof. He tells him that they believe as true every word he has said and every one of them would cast his vote for Marcus. He also promises to get their wives’ votes too in his favour. But, he then tells him straightaway that it is shameful to accept two shillings for their vote. He then says that if Marcus were a poor man they would give their vote free as they had done it before. Then the old leader argues that Marcus is a great man and does his things like a great man. Then he tells Roof that they did not demand money before and they will not ask him in future.

The writer also uses the same language to mock at Roof. He says that Roof had also lately been taking down a ‘lot of firewood’ from Marcus. The previous day, he had taken a rich robe from Marcus. Moreover, Marcus himself had rebuked his wife when she objected to Roof taking his fifth bottle of beer from the refrigerator. Furthermore, Roof had been chauffeur-driven to the disputed site, about a land case which he won. Having enjoyed all such benefits from Marcus, Roof understood the demands of the elders. Therefore, he finally drops two more shillings in front of each one of them and tells them in a tone of finality that he is through with it, and pretends to be defiant. Then he ends his campaign with the sentence, “Cast your paper for the enemy if you like!” The elders quickly calm him down with a placatory speech agreeing to vote for Marcus, and pick up the coins on the floor, with a feeling that they have not lost their decorum and dignity in the bargain.

The author has until now introduced the reader to the existing situation. Now he is going to talk about the opposition party. The author here satirises how opposition parties come into being and how sincere they are in their objectives and in their fighting strategies.

In his ‘whispering campaign’, Roof had asked the elders, in the end, to give their vote to the enemy. The enemy of PAP was a new party called the Progressive Organisation Party (POP). It had been formed by the tribes down the coast. The founders of the party claimed that they had founded the party to save themselves from “totally political, cultural, social and religious annihilation”. The party organizers (of POP) knew that they had no chance of winning against the PAP, yet they had taken the plunge for a straight fight with PAP. They had provided cars and loudspeakers to a few rascals and thugs to go around and make a lot of noise. The author hints that they had also spent a lot of money in Umuofia. The writer comments that such money will only make the local campaigners very rich.

The action now reaches the climax. The writer tells the reader that as the election day was approaching nearer, for Roof “everything was moving as planned”.

One evening the leader of the POP campaign team comes to visit Roof. Although they were well known to each other, his visit is cold and businesslike. He places five pounds on the floor before Roof and tells him that they want his vote. Roof immediately gets up from his chair, closes the outside door carefully and comes back to his chair. Within that short time Roof has weighed the proposition. Roof tries to give a reason to the other person for not accepting his proposition. Roof tells him that he was working for Marcus and it would be very bad to accept it. But the other person had come prepared for such an answer. So he tells him that Marcus would not be there when Roof puts his ballot paper in the box. Then, in a dismissive tone, he tells Roof that they have plenty of work to do that night, and asks him whether he is going to accept it or not.

Roof asks him whether anyone would talk about it outside. The other man tells him categorically that they wanted votes and not gossip. Roof accepts the money. Then they get Roof to swear that he would vote for Maduka in front of a little object called ‘iyi’, which had been brought from Mbanta. However, Roof does not hesitate but says aloud that he would cast his vote for Maduka, failing which the ‘iyi’ will take note. The other man is satisfied and leaves. Before he leaves Roof tells him that Maduka has no chance of winning against Marcus. But the other person tells him that it would be enough if he gets a few votes that time, and he “would get more in the following election. All that they wanted was to make the people know that Maduka will give pounds and not shillings”.

The narrator describes the town and the mood of the people. We learn that Chief the Honourable Marcus Ibe was doing things in grand style. He hires a highlife band from Umuru and stations it at a distance considered lawful. Many villagers dance to the music before proceeding to the booths. Some people shake hands with the great man ‘Marcus’ and congratulate him in advance. Roof and his campaign boys give last-minute advice to the people and try to win Marcus’ appreciation. The writer then tells us that Marcus was a stickler for details. He wants to ensure that not a single vote goes to the other party. Therefore, as soon as the first rush of voters is over, he promptly asks his campaign boys to go one at a time and put in their ballot papers. He asks Roof to go first.

Roof dashes off towards the booths without any hesitation. After the electoral officer has explained to him about the two boxes, he goes in and sees the two boxes one of which has the picture of the car and the other, the head. Roof brings out his ballot paper and looks at it. He does not like to betray Marcus even in secret. For a few seconds, he feels like going back to the other man and returning his five pounds. Then he realizes that it is impossible because he has sworn on that ‘iyi’. Then he recalls the red five-pound notes. Roof’s mind works quick as lightning. He folds the paper, tears it in two along the crease and puts one half in each box. He puts the first half into Maduka’s box and says to himself aloud, “I vote for Maduka”, and comes out. The election officials mark his thumb with indelible purple ink and he walks out of the booth as jauntily as he has gone in.

The Voter Summary in Kannada

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Glossary:

  • Port Harcourt: the capital of Rivers State, Nigeria.
  • Umuofia: one of a fictional group of nine villages in Nigeria, inhabited by the Igbo people
  • en masse: in one group or body; altogether
  • ozo feast: highest and most important magico-religious festival in the Igbo clan of Nigeria.
  • iroko tree: is a large hardwood tree from the west coast of tropical Africa; it is a tree which grows very high and which is very difficult to climb but which yields very good quality timber; Native deity; something with magical powers – anyone swearing an oath on an iyi would be afraid to violate his oath because if he did so he would be cursed and punished terribly
  • landslide victory: a victory by a large margin; a very substantial victory, particularly in an election
  • mesmerize: to hold the complete attention bf; spellbind
  • a village lout: a rude, young man (derogatory); a simpleton
  • chieftaincy titles: titles given to important people in a village
  • naivety: without the experience of social rules or behaviour
  • eloquent: expressing or showing something very strongly without words
  • the host: the holy bread eaten in the Christian service of the Communion
  • deign: to lower oneself to do something one considers unimportant
  • decorum: behaviour/appearance showing proper respect for the manners and customs of society
  • annihilation: complete destruction
  • Mbanta: the name of a place known for people who could prepare very powerful iyis
  • sidled: to move uncertainly or secretively as if ready to turn and go the other way
  • Abina pickinim de born?: Is he giving birth to a child?
  • indelible: marks that cannot be rubbed out; permanent
  • jauntily: confident and pleased with life
  • lout: a clumsy, crude person
  • complete non-entity: entirely unimportant person
  • christened: named
  • stickler: a person who absolutely insists on something
  • muffled: deadened or suppressed
  • non-entity: a person without much ability, character or importance
  • Ozo feast: ‘Ozo’ is the name of a title conferred on a man for meritorious deeds; Ozo feast is a grand feast during which such a title is conferred on a man

The main aim is to share the knowledge and help the students of 2nd PUC to secure the best score in their final exams. Use the concepts of Karnataka 2nd PUC English Answers Chapter 12 The Voter in Real time to enhance your skills. If you have any doubts you can post your comments in the comment section, We will clarify your doubts as soon as possible without any delay.

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